Ball Mason Jar

When I was little I remember going out with my grandma to pick berries. She had raspberries and blackberries which grew in her yard and we would walk to the farm near her house to pick strawberries and peaches. While I was content eating the berries and fruit as we went along or out of the little baskets once we got home my grandmother had much bigger plans for our plunder. My grandma would disappear into the basement, with most of what we had picked, down to where she would start about preserving everything into jams. My grandmas jams were always a favorite with our family and her neighbors.
I was always fascinated by the stack of boxes in the basement she had filled with Mason Jars. As a child the jars made no sense to me. Why were they in two pieces? My peanut butter jar had a lid that was solid and it worked just fine. Its absurdity only made me the more interested and I would sit and take apart the jars and think of the reasons and applications for which the jar opened in such a fashion.
Many companies produce Mason Jars, also known as preserve jars, fruit jars and canning jars. The brilliance with Mason Jars isn't actually the jar at all but the two piece lid with rubber lip which creates a hermetic seal when closed.
Although the Mason jar was invented and patented in 1858 by Philadelphia tinsmith John Landis Mason, and there are many different types of Mason Jars, one of the names most ubiquitous with Mason Jars is Ball. The Ball Brothers, Frank and Edmund, borrowed $200 from their Uncle George Ball in 1880 to buy the Wooden Jacket Can Company. In 1882, the factory that supplied the glass containers the Ball brothers had been using was destroyed by fire and instead of seeking a new supplier the Ball brothers built their own factory in Buffalo, NY. In 1884, the Ball brothers produced their first Mason Jar fruit jar.

Ball Mason Jar
Ball Mason Jar
Ball Mason Jar
Ball Mason Jar
Ball Mason Jar
Ball Mason Jar